Business Fish
Credit: PowerCore

 

It’s favorable winds for Alaska salmon based on market indicators so far. Starter grounds prices for fishermen at Copper River were reported at $10 a pound for sockeyes and $15 for kings.

That compares to Covid-crashed prices last year at $3 for reds and $6.50 for king salmon; this year’s first opener prices are in line with 2019 start-offs.

The first 12-hour fishery produced a total of 9,750 fish: 7,779 sockeyes and 1,802 king salmon, said Fish and Game in Cordova by 395 deliveries.

For wild salmon’s bellwether – sockeyes from Bristol Bay – markets appear “very favorable” heading into the 2021season with strong demand.

Intel from the fishermen-funded and operated Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association says business risk due to the pandemic is down, demand is robust, global currencies favor buying from the U.S. and processing operations at Bristol Bay are in good shape.

While overall costs are expected to be higher, market conditions suggest a higher final/average dock price for Bristol Bay fishermen, the BBRSDA said.

Another indicator – US frozen sockeye exports in March averaged $3.66 a pound at first-wholesale, the highest in a decade.

Other salmon inventories are in short supply, says Rob Reierson of global marketer Tradex, especially chums. He says chum sales will move fast early in the season.

“There is an extreme lack of Chum Salmon that has put a supply strain on all other species of wild salmon. It is in my opinion that buyers need to stay extra vigilant to qualify any wild salmon offers they are receiving. Our recommendation is to get your Chum Salmon program in order, starting with inquiries into what volumes and sizes you will require this year.”

Switching to Pacific halibut: Prices are running about $2 higher for fishermen than last year, nearing or over $6 a pound at most major ports.

It’s favorable winds for Alaska salmon based on market indicators so far. Starter grounds prices for fishermen at Copper River were reported at $10 a pound for sockeyes and $15 for kings.

That compares to Covid-crashed prices last year at $3 for reds and $6.50 for king salmon; this year’s first opener prices are in line with 2019 start-offs.

The first 12-hour fishery produced a total of 9,750 fish: 7,779 sockeyes and 1,802 king salmon, said Fish and Game in Cordova by 395 deliveries.

For wild salmon’s bellwether – sockeyes from Bristol Bay – markets appear “very favorable” heading into the 2021season with strong demand.

Intel from the fishermen-funded and operated Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association says business risk due to the pandemic is down, demand is robust, global currencies favor buying from the U.S. and processing operations at Bristol Bay are in good shape.

While overall costs are expected to be higher, market conditions suggest a higher final/average dock price for Bristol Bay fishermen, the BBRSDA said.

Another indicator – US frozen sockeye exports in March averaged $3.66 a pound at first-wholesale, the highest in a decade.

Other salmon inventories are in short supply, says Rob Reierson of global marketer Tradex, especially chums. He says chum sales will move fast early in the season.

“There is an extreme lack of Chum Salmon that has put a supply strain on all other species of wild salmon. It is in my opinion that buyers need to stay extra vigilant to qualify any wild salmon offers they are receiving. Our recommendation is to get your Chum Salmon program in order, starting with inquiries into what volumes and sizes you will require this year.”

Switching to Pacific halibut: Prices are running about $2 higher for fishermen than last year, nearing or over $6 a pound at most major ports.

Demand for higher priced fresh halibut usually tapers off at this time, but Rob Reierson says not so this year.

“For halibut, demand in the fresh market is strong, and fresh halibut continues to dominate sales.
Historically, we have seen processors freeze halibut after Mother’s Day, however given the strong demand for fresh halibut, this could potentially delay production of frozen Halibut.”

Find links to Alaska fish prices and catches at www.alaskafishradio.com and on Facebook and Twitter.

Demand for higher priced fresh halibut usually tapers off at this time, but Rob Reierson says not so this year.

“For halibut, demand in the fresh market is strong, and fresh halibut continues to dominate sales.
Historically, we have seen processors freeze halibut after Mother’s Day, however given the strong demand for fresh halibut, this could potentially delay production of frozen Halibut.”

 

 

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