Fish Radio                            
July 25, 2013                  Fish farmers say no to GMOs

 This is Fish Radio. Fish Farmers are no fans of Frankenfish.  I’ll tell you more after this –  GMO salmon

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Fish farmers and fishermen can find common ground when it comes to opposing genetically tweaked salmon, or Frankenfish.

 I think we absolutely don’t need it.    

 Josh Goldman is CEO of Australis Aquaculture, the world’s largest producer of barramundi, a sea bass that is Australia’s most popular fish. Australis has won numerous high standards awards for its farming operations in Massachusetts and Viet Nam.  Australis Aquaculture

 We can make fantastic gains in the productivity of fish without resorting to genetic modification.   

 Goldman says fish health and growth rates can be improved with good old fashioned selective breeding. And it’s clear that consumers don’t like the idea of manmade fish.

  I think it is pretty clear that in the case of fish, the consumers do not want genetically modified animals and the industry would be wise to stay away from it. 5   Anyone who is going to do well in business is going to listen to their consumer very carefully. Many in the salmon industry have been quite clear that they are really not interested in that technology today.  

 Another common ground, Goldman says, is   getting Americans to eat more seafood.

  Collectively, farmed and wild producers should be doing more to make seafood attractive and presentable to the consumer.

 Goldman says Australis emulates the way that Alaska highlights the health benefits of its seafood and the way it is produced, and its commitment to sustainable fisheries.

 I think it is regarded very, very well at the foundation, because Alaska has done a better job than most other parts of the country and the world in really having sound management of its fishery resources, and the fact that it’s been more science than politics has really set an example – and I think that message ultimately rings through to the consumer about well managed fisheries. So I think there is a lot to be proud of.

Fish Radio is also brought to you by Ocean Beauty Seafoods – who salutes and says thanks to the men and women fishing across Alaska for their hard work and dedication. (www.oceanbeauty.com) In Kodiak, I’m Laine Welch.

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